Archive | December, 2012

introducing solids to baby

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Introducing solids to your baby and weaning your baby through baby-led weaning

Posted on 11 December 2012 by hulda

introducing solids to babyFood is for exploring until your baby is one year old. Sofie Jacobs, who teaches the “Introduction to Solids Workshop” at Annerley, explains that there is no rush to introduce solids.

Introducing solid foods to your baby is an important milestone in a baby’s development, so parents often have many questions about it as not everything may go as expected. Some babies are slow eaters; a few may be picky eaters; while others may decide to stop eating solid foods for a few days. It can be frustrating for parents who expect their children to eat whatever they are given, but Sofie Jacobs, who teaches the “Introduction to Soilds Workshop” at Annerley, says that the early stage of weaning is mainly about exploring and introducing different flavours and textures. Parents should not compare their baby’s weaning process to another. Instead, remember “food is for fun until you’re one.” Sofie shares her insight and experience.

Top five tips for parents introducing solids to their babies

  1. Parents should attend a weaning workshop, ideally when the baby is between 3½ to 5 months old to get all the information they need.
  2. Don’t worry about the amount of solids your baby is taking. Milk, formula, or a combination of both will still be the main source of nutrients until your baby is fully weaned at around 10 months.
  3. Allow your baby to explore and learn different textures and flavours. Also, include foods that you may not be a fan of yourself.
  4. Each baby is different, so do not compare your baby’s weaning process to another.
  5. Relax and have fun!

Common problems parents face when it comes to introducing solids to their babies

  • Some babies can be slow eaters. This may seem like a problem, but it is important to remember that the early stages of weaning are mainly about exploring and introducing different flavours and textures.
  • Babies often gag. This may be scary to some parents, but it is important to remember that babies gag because their gag reflexes are well-developed as a safety mechanism to prevent choking. Attending a pediatric first aid course may help instill some confidence.
  • Babies may go “off” on their food for a few days. Dentist in the Tucson area have been teaching parents that this is common, especially on days when the baby is dealing with gum inflammation due to teething. On those days you can offer your baby more milk, but don’t panic even if the milk feeds do not go too well.
  • Babies not liking certain foods. This may get parents worrying about their baby possibly becoming a fussy eater. If there is a certain food your baby does not seem to like, you can try re-introducing it later where there is a good chance he or she will take it.
  • The baby’s first foods must be purees and a strict weaning plan must be followed. This idea comes from more traditional weaning methods, but it is certainly not a must. Baby-led weaning is a perfectly safe method that does not call for purees or a strict weaning plan.
  • The baby must be 6 months old before starting solids. This is just a guideline and not a “set in stone” requirement. There are plenty of babies who are perfectly satisfied with just milk until then, but there are also plenty of babies who are looking for something extra to explore before they reach 6 months. However, I advise parents to start after 17 weeks and to always speak to a weaning specialist or pediatrician if you are unsure.
  • Babies cannot eat eggs before they are one year old. From 6 months of age, babies can safely have eggs provided they are cooked through and there is no family history of food allergies. If there is a family history of food allergies, it is best to speak with an allergy specialist before weaning, as food allergies can be hereditary.
  • Babies must have teeth before introducing finger foods. If your baby does not have teeth yet, he or she will simply gnaw instead of bite.
  • Weaning will help your baby sleep through the night. This theory does not always work and it definitely should not be the reason to start weaning early.

Common misconceptions parents have when it comes to introducing solids to their babies

What is baby-led weaning and why is it a good way of introducing solids?

Baby-led weaning allows your baby to feed him or herself. It is a safe but relaxed way to introduce your baby to solid food starting at 6 months of age. There is no set-in-stone program to follow, so as long as parents keep in mind the (short) list of foods to avoid, they cannot go wrong.

What are some key points parents will leave with after taking the “Introducing Solids Workshop”?

The workshop contains the essential information on both traditional weaning methods and baby-led weaning including:

  • When to start introducing solids
  • How to start introducing solids
  • How much food to give
  • Foods to include in the diet
  • Foods to avoid
  • Allergy triggers
  • Allergy symptoms

At the end of the workshop, parents should feel confident to get started and not be scared to include scrambled eggs on toast in their baby’s menu!

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Advice on how to wean your baby through baby-led weaning

Advice on how to wean your baby through baby-led weaning

Posted on 11 December 2012 by hulda

advice on baby-led weaningSofie Jacobs, who teaches the “Introduction to Soilds Workshop” at Annerley, says that the early stage of weaning is mainly about exploring and introducing different flavours and textures. Parents should not compare their baby’s weaning process to another. Instead, take it easy and just let you baby learn have fun with food.

In the current issue of Playtimes Magazine, Hulda shares her experience with baby-led weaning and offers her advice:

“When babies begin weaning, some get stuck on foods that are too simple and too runny for too long. This develops poor food habits. The taste of the food is limited,” says Hulda. By six or seven months, even experts in the traditional methods of purée-based weaning suggest offering hand food, so that babies experience textures, recognise ingredients and learn to chew. With that in mind, Hulda says that anyone can incorporate levels of baby-led weaning, at whatever pace suits them.

You can read the full article online at Playtimes Magazine.

Want to know more about how to wean your child or learn more about baby-led weaning? Sign up for Annerley’s Introduction to Solids Workshop to get the advice you need and your questions answered.

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Getting your kids to try new foods at mealtime – Green Eggs and Ham

Getting your kids to try new foods at mealtime – Green Eggs and Ham

Posted on 10 December 2012 by hulda

Orla’s latest article in Playtimes Magazine gives advice to parents to be persistent in getting your kids to try new foods.

My eureka moment happened when we were reading one of their favourite bedtime stories. Dr Seuss’s Green Eggs and Ham has always been hugely popular in our home. It’s a rip-roaring tale of a grouchy old git who is pursued by an over-enthusiastic character called Sam I Am, who’s hell-bent on getting him to try the latest and greatest cuisine. Needless to say, Grouchy is not too keen. Even I know that matching a food capable of carrying salmonella with green food colouring borders on insanity. However, Sam I Am is not deterred. He chases him o’er land and sea with his plate of food insisting that Grouchy at least try it. Eventually Grouchy is worn down – he just can’t take the constant repetitive asking. I know how he feels, and even though I would advise against it, he gives in to Sam’s demands. This has to end in disaster. But wait! It turns out that Sam was right all along. Grouchy doesn’t just like green eggs and ham, he absolutely LOVES it! And that was when the penny dropped.

Orla is an EFT Therapist who leads Annerley‘s Daddy 101 (for first time fathers and fathers-to-be), Daddy 202 (for second-time fathers), the Truth about Motherhood, and Second Time Around for Mums workshops. Parents and parents-t0-be can expect entertaining and practical advice to help reduce the stress and increase the joy in their lives as parents.

To read the full article, please click here or visit Playtimes Magazine.

 

 

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